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Network Development Fund


CHASE Music Network
Jun
30
10:30 am10:30

CHASE Music Network

  • Open University

This one-day event will celebrate achievements in music research at institutions belonging to the Consortium for the Humanities and the Arts South-East England (the Courtauld Institute of Art, Goldsmiths, University of London, the Open University, the Universities of Kent, Sussex, Essex and East Anglia, Birkbeck, University of London and SOAS, University of London).

Animate Assembly (within Arts & Humanities in the Digital Age)
Jun
10
12:00 pm12:00

Animate Assembly (within Arts & Humanities in the Digital Age)

Animation may be understood as a discrete set of experiential and technological possibilities, on the one hand, and a generalised politico-economic set of conditions on the other. Drawing on the crossovers and proliferations afforded by this doubling, the Animate Assembly network aims to debate the currency and significance of analogue and digital animation studies in view of the fundamental transformations occurring in cultural knowledge.

Through the first sessions across Goldsmiths and Birkbeck the polemics and poetics of animation are explored by means of research screenings and collective work toward the first entries for a glossary of animation. WJT Mitchell will contribute a seminar and keynote on relevant themes in June.

Periodical Studies
May
13
11:30 am11:30

Periodical Studies

  • University of East Anglia

The organizers of the conference, Dr. Jennie Batchelor and Dr. James Robert Wood, both have central research interests in periodical studies. Jennie Batchelor is currently the Principal Investigator of a two-year Leverhulme Research Project Grant on The Lady’s Magazine. Her current book project on women’s magazines of the Romantic era is tentatively titled Guilty and Other Pleasures. Dr. James Robert Wood is lecturer in eighteenth-century literature at the University of East Anglia. He has published an essay  on Joseph Addison's and Richard Steele's periodical The Spectator in Eighteenth-Century Life. He is currently working on an essay entitled "Women's Learning in Women's Periodicals" for The Edinburgh Companion to Women’s Print Media in Britain, 1690-1820.

Mapping Narratives
Apr
29
10:00 am10:00

Mapping Narratives

  • The Courtauld Institute of Art

The Network Development Event will take place at the Courtauld on 29th April with invited participants only.

The Matter of the Archive before 1700
Apr
21
10:00 am10:00

The Matter of the Archive before 1700

  • Room 114 Keynes Library

We intend to have a very loosely structured day, with lots of opportunities to meet each other, talk about research, and begin conversations. We are keen to share knowledge and practice, as well as open up broad areas for discussion and research network development across institutions and disciplines. We also see this day as an opportunity to identify and develop relationships with archives, repositories, and libraries which can become partners in both training and research activities. There is room for about a dozen further participants to attend. If any colleagues, including doctoral students, would like to participate, please get in touch: c.goodson@bbk.ac.uk.

Eighteeth Century Femininities - Launch Event
Sep
29
10:30 am10:30

Eighteeth Century Femininities - Launch Event

  • Room 114

We are delighted to announce the programme for an event to celebrate the launch of a new CHASE network on the theme of ‘Eighteenth-Century Femininities’. The purpose of the event is to invite researchers from across departments and schools at CHASE institutions to get to know each other, to foster research collaborations, and to discuss new projects which could emerge from this interdisciplinary network.

People living not ‘by the book’: exploring nominal religious identities of Christians, Jews and Muslims
Jul
22
12:30 pm12:30

People living not ‘by the book’: exploring nominal religious identities of Christians, Jews and Muslims

  • Goldsmiths, University of London

Thanks to the CHASE Network Development Fund a special discussion seminar on the topic of ‘nominal’ religious identities will be held at Goldsmiths on July 22. The event is co-hosted by the Department of Religious Studies, University of Kent, and the Religion Media Centre at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Led by Dr Abby Day and Prof. Adam Dinham the workshop is exclusively for members of the CHASE consortium working in areas of contemporary religion. It is being held with a view to submitting grant proposals on the topic of nominal/secular religious identity. We are particularly interested in the identities and practices of the ‘nominal’ population: people who, in certain contexts, self-identify with a religion but usually describe themselves as ‘not religious’.

Policy-makers very often frame plans around the misguided idea that there awaits armies of volunteers in churches, mosques, and other religious communities. Media also work with false assumptions. Not all self-identifying Christians, Jews, and Muslims are equally religious, and yet the media portrays Christian, Jewish, and Muslim and identities in much the same manner: either ‘normal’ ‘moderate’ or ‘extreme’ and therefore different from the general population. By focusing on  explicitly non-religious (by their own definition) participants who nevertheless identify as Christian, Jew or Muslim the proposed study or studies may produce new variations on an understanding of religious  identity and its implications for research, teaching, media,  policy and practice.

The three religious groups were chosen initially because they are the three monotheistic, theologically related religions in the UK, sharing large common bodies of sacred texts (‘People of the Book’), yet often in conflict with each other. The feasibility of extending this question to other UK religions – as well as Paganism - will also be explored.

The July 22 event will begin with lunch at 12.30 and carry through the afternoon with discussion until 5 pm.

Thanks to the CHASE Network Development Fund a special discussion seminar on the topic of ‘nominal’ religious identities will be held at Goldsmiths on July 22. The event is co-hosted by the Department of Religious Studies, University of Kent, and the Religion Media Centre at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Led by Dr Abby Day and Prof. Adam Dinham the workshop is exclusively for members of the CHASE consortium working in areas of contemporary religion. It is being held with a view to submitting grant proposals on the topic of nominal/secular religious identity. We are particularly interested in the identities and practices of the ‘nominal’ population: people who, in certain contexts, self-identify with a religion but usually describe themselves as ‘not religious’.

Policy-makers very often frame plans around the misguided idea that there awaits armies of volunteers in churches, mosques, and other religious communities. Media also work with false assumptions. Not all self-identifying Christians, Jews, and Muslims are equally religious, and yet the media portrays Christian, Jewish, and Muslim and identities in much the same manner: either ‘normal’ ‘moderate’ or ‘extreme’ and therefore different from the general population. By focusing on  explicitly non-religious (by their own definition) participants who nevertheless identify as Christian, Jew or Muslim the proposed study or studies may produce new variations on an understanding of religious  identity and its implications for research, teaching, media,  policy and practice.

The three religious groups were chosen initially because they are the three monotheistic, theologically related religions in the UK, sharing large common bodies of sacred texts (‘People of the Book’), yet often in conflict with each other. The feasibility of extending this question to other UK religions – as well as Paganism - will also be explored.

The July 22 event will begin with lunch at 12.30 and carry through the afternoon with discussion until 5 pm.

CHASE Digital Humanities Network first meeting
Jul
17
11:00 am11:00

CHASE Digital Humanities Network first meeting

  • The Open University in London

This initial meeting will facilitate two primary areas of discussion.
First, we want to discuss the framework for building a Digital Humanities network across CHASE. Agenda items will include: the extent and scope of Digital Humanities activities across CHASE; areas of common interest which could provide a basis for future collaboration; the mechanisms for future interactions within the network; strategies for developing Digital Humanities; and appropriate sources of funding for these planned activities.

Second, we would like to discuss lessons learned from this years “Arts and Humanities in the Digital Age” doctoral training programme, and plan an inspiring offering for PGR training in digital research skills for forthcoming years.

Languages of the Global: Women and International Political Thought
Jul
16
10:00 am10:00

Languages of the Global: Women and International Political Thought

  • German Historical Institute

This workshop, held at the German Historical Institute, London, brings together scholars across the disciplines of international, global and imperial history as well as literary theory and international relations to develop new approaches that consider women’s contribution to ‘thinking the global’.

Thinking Home: An interdisciplinary symposium and workshop
Jul
10
Jul 11

Thinking Home: An interdisciplinary symposium and workshop

  • University of Essex

Ask friends, colleagues or strangers where their home is and the response is usually telling. A typical response runs, ‘Well, I live and work there and there now, but….’ One of the functions of this interdisciplinary symposium is to ask what imaginative reality lies behind that ‘but’. A concept, an experience, and a discourse, home is a focal point around which mental and material activities such as shaping of familial memory and political and cultural identity, cross-cultural migration, displacement, and belonging evolve.

SPARC Networking Event (Spatial and GeoHumanities Research Collaborations)
Jul
6
2:00 pm14:00

SPARC Networking Event (Spatial and GeoHumanities Research Collaborations)

  • Kent Medway Campus

Researchers and research technicians across CHASE institutions are warmly invited to express their interest to partake in this CHASE research networking event to be held at University of Kent’s Medway Campus.

The key aim of this event is to harness connections within the CHASE consortium for collaborative research with affinity to the interest fields of Spatial and GeoHumanities.