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Mapping Narratives

Events

Mapping Narratives

  • British Library Seminar Room British Library

The following event is part of the wider CHASE training programme, Mapping Narratives. The programme can be applied for by using the link below.

Mapping Narratives will begin by analysing the act of mapping, where selected elements are removed from their original setting and transposed to a new and different context. These elements could, for example, consist of literary descriptions of physical spaces that are mapped and visually represented.

Although mapping has traditionally been regarded as a branch of geography, this course will consider mapping as a research method applicable to disciplines within the humanities, such as art, history, architecture, literature, performance and philosophy. We will be thinking of mapping as a process of representation and conceptualisation, of modelling ideas and material from one subject area to another, so as to aid communication and interdisciplinary research. To that end, we acknowledge the various influences from phenomenology, theories of embodiment, and the ‘spatial turn’ in critical theory (see bibliography).

The course will begin by analysing the act of mapping, where selected elements are removed from their original setting and transposed to a new and different context. These elements could, for example, consist of literary descriptions of physical spaces that are mapped and visually represented. What occurs within these transpositions? What insights are provided by the creation of new conditions? Whether we understand this re-contextualisation in terms of ‘loci’ (Cicero) or ‘planes of consistency’ (Deleuze and Guattari), the re-mapped elements communicate not only a fresh understanding of themselves and their contexts, but also the disciplinary boundaries in which they operate. Thinking, and above all making, at the edge of disciplines, at where they potentially intersect, allows for critical reflection upon how disciplines are structured and organised. In so doing, the course will examine how the mapping of spaces generates new perceptions, images and narrative constructs that influence both the discourses in which we communicate and the lives we inhabit. 

10:00 Mapping Narratives: Cities and Literature – the Reciprocities
Introduction by Gordana Fontana-Giusti, University of Kent
Paul March-Russell, University of Kent
James Perkins - British Library, British Library

11:00 Mapping Narratives: London’s Victorian Cemeteries
Presentation 1:
Dr. Gian Luca Amadei (Kent PhD Graduate) on London and its Victorian Cemeteries
Chair: Gordana Fontana-Giusti
Respondent:  Tom Harper, Lead Curator Antiquarian Maps, British Library
Documents on show: London maps from the Maps Collection of the British Library

13:00 Lunch (sandwiches served)

14:00 Mapping Narratives: Mervyn Peake and Spacing of Literature ~
Presentation 2:
Imogen Lesser (final-year PhD student), University of Kent
Chair: Paul March-Russell;
Respondent:  Helen Melody, Lead Curator, Contemporary Literary and Creative Archives, British Library
Documents on show: Peake’s manuscripts from the British Library

16:00 The End